Bungle bungle

bungle bungle

What are the Bungle Bungle Bungles?

The orange and black towers of rock rising above deep green forest are almost as strange as their name: the Bungle Bungle Range. Familiar to Aboriginal Australians for centuries, or perhaps millennia, most Europeans knew nothing of the Bungle Bungles until the 1980s, when they became part of the Purnululu National Park in northwestern Australia.

What are the departure points from the Bungle Bungle?

There are a number of departure points - Kununurra, Broome, Halls Creek, and the Bungle Bungle Caravan Park, and you can also choose to land at the park for a guided 4WD and walking tour, or to stay overnight.

Is the Bungle Bungle Range the best available science?

At the time of publication, it represented the best available science. The orange and black towers of rock rising above deep green forest are almost as strange as their name: the Bungle Bungle Range.

What are the orange bands on the Bungle Bungle?

The orange bands are made by a thin layer of iron and manganese, which coats layers of the rock, making them less permeable to water. This detailed image of the Bungle Bungle Range was captured by the Ikonos satellite on April 7, 2003.

What makes the Bungle Bungle Range unique?

The Bungle Bungle Range is made up of unique rock formations that closely resemble the look of a beehives, standing about 250 meters high. The bands that wrap around the rock are formed by layers of sandstone, pebbles and larger rocks that have being cemented together.

Where is the Bungle Bungle National Park?

Bungle Bungle Rising 300 metres above the grass-covered plains that surround them, the orange and black sandstone domes known as the Bungle Bungle are one of the world’s most fascinating geological landmarks. The world heritage listed Bungle Bungle Range is located within Purnululu National Park in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

What are the dark bands on the Bungle Bungle?

The darker bands are on the layers of rock which hold more moisture, and are a dark algal or cyanobacteria growth. The orange coloured layers are stained with iron and manganese mineral deposits contained within the sandstone. The Bungle Bungle Range formation occupies an area of approximately 450 square kilometres (174 sq mi).

Where did the Bungle Bungles come from?

Foremost, the stunning beauty of the Bungle Bungles formed in what now constitutes the western portion of the country of Australia. Furthermore, because of its magnificent beauty and importance, it now forms a central part of the Purnululu National Park, part of the Kimberley Region.

Where is the Bungle Bungle Range?

The Bungle Bungle Range is a unique land form which forms the major part of the Purnululu National Park in the Kimberley Region, in the northern part of the State of Western Australia, within the Commonwealth of Australia.

Can you climb in Bungle Bungles National Park?

This is a very fragile environment, hence you are not allowed to do any climbing or similar. In fact, there are only a few hikes through the range in the Bungle Bungles National Park and you are not allowed to leave the paths. Most of the range is protected from human feet trampling through it.

How old are the Bungle Bungle domes?

What people usually want to know is how the striped domes were formed, so here goes ... The sandstone formation of the Bungle Bungle ranges is estimated to be 350 million years old, give or take a few millions. Like the reefs at the Geikie and Windjana gorges the range was formed during the Devonian period.

What are the dark bands on the Bungle Bungle?

The darker bands are on the layers of rock which hold more moisture, and are a dark algal or cyanobacteria growth. The orange coloured layers are stained with iron and manganese mineral deposits contained within the sandstone. The Bungle Bungle Range formation occupies an area of approximately 450 square kilometres (174 sq mi).

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